The First Hemicuda

This documented 1970 prototype ’Cuda shows its pre-production quirks. Fender tag indicates sport (hockey) stripe delete. The car was built without road lamps and chrome hood pins. Being hand-assembled, there was never any blackout

C’mon Baby Flite My Fire

 Ed Britz takes the ’55 DeSoto’s “advanced styling” and Hemi power to the next level and beyond. Photos: Paul Stenquist Ed Britz built this ’55 DeSoto Fireflight all by himself working daily for two years and eight months.  The

Ride With The Devil

Chrysler built the Diablo as a devilishly huge concept to fork over its GM show car competition. Conceived by Exner, and executed by Ghia, the Diablo was the biggest, boldest factory concept/show car of its day. Jacking tabs (under

Cutting Edges

A showcase of the fine art of automotive metalcraft. We’ve always envied the other Mopar magazines, the way they can take a bunch of cars, or exhaust pipes, or ashtray handles and put them all in one feature under a common theme.

Ultimate Big-Block Build

Hellcat Schmellcat. Everyone is running around today with 700-1000+ horsepower. Even Top Fuel Hemis max out at around 13,000 horsepower. Well, Mopar Action is gonna blow all those wimp motors into the wees. How does 108,920 horsepower

Hartbreaker

Comedian Kevin Hart was in no joking mood after driver Jared Black put Kev’s custom ’70 ‘Cuda through a fence and down an embankment on LA’s notorious Mulhulland Drive. Kevin had bought the ‘Cuda as a 40h birthday present for

So You Wanna Be An Auto Journalist, Eh?

We get lots of requests from young aspiring writers, photog­raphers and folks running from the law on how to break into the automotive writing business. To these young car enthusiasts, writing about musclecars, drag racing, drifting and

In Search of Stoplight Drags

TheBruntBros park the Mopar Action pickup at a motel somewhere in the Midwest on their way back from California to New York. Once in a while, we just can’t resist tooting our own horn. I mean we’ve assembled a staff here that is