Coke Machine

The second generation Chargers were defined by their Coke-bottle shape. But the Coke Car actually sounds as realistic as it looks. By Cliff Gromer Photos by Cliff Gromer and Todd Dziadosz 1969 Charger is restored to mostly

Smokin’ At The Nats

The ever-popular burnout contest reaches new heights in tire smoke generation at the Mopar Nationals. Photos by Dan Gallo and TheBruntBros Spin the wheels takes on different meanings in Vegas and The Nats You need not inhale to

1959 Imperial Speedster

A snazzy luxo-sport Vette and T-Bird stalker in the Exner style of design. Story and photos by Paul Stenquist It was several years ago that Murray Pfaff and his father peered into the dark recesses of a crumbling carriage house in

Tommy Can You Hear Me?

The Chrysler-powered air raid siren was the loudest man-made object in 1956. Yeah, even louder than your wife. The Walter P. Chrysler Museum-restored air raid siren is powered by a 1956 180 horsepower Chrysler Industrial 331 cubic inch

The First Hemicuda

This documented 1970 prototype ’Cuda shows its pre-production quirks. Fender tag indicates sport (hockey) stripe delete. The car was built without road lamps and chrome hood pins. Being hand-assembled, there was never any blackout

C’mon Baby Flite My Fire

 Ed Britz takes the ’55 DeSoto’s “advanced styling” and Hemi power to the next level and beyond. Photos: Paul Stenquist Ed Britz built this ’55 DeSoto Fireflight all by himself working daily for two years and eight months.  The

Ride With The Devil

Chrysler built the Diablo as a devilishly huge concept to fork over its GM show car competition. Conceived by Exner, and executed by Ghia, the Diablo was the biggest, boldest factory concept/show car of its day. Jacking tabs (under

Cutting Edges

A showcase of the fine art of automotive metalcraft. We’ve always envied the other Mopar magazines, the way they can take a bunch of cars, or exhaust pipes, or ashtray handles and put them all in one feature under a common theme.